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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 29, 2017 2:00pm-3:00pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm rebecca jones. the headlines at 2pm: the governor of the bank of england gives his clearest signal yet that interest rates are set to rise for the first time in ten years. if the economy continues on the track that it's been on, and all indications are that it is, in the relatively near term we can expect that interest rates would increase somewhat. the aviation minister says ryainair has behaved "disgracefully" in an system amid warnings that families could be left homeless and destitute. the aviation minister says ryainair has behaved "disgracefully" towards its passengers, for its handling of the cancellation of thousands of flights. three former tesco executives go on trial over their alleged role in a multi—million pound accounting scandal. also this hour: a british man is killed in a rock fall at yosemite national park in california. andrew foster and his wife,
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from cardiff, were caught when rocks tumbled down the face of "el capitan". new evidence is unveiled which suggests the drawing on the right could be a sketch for da vinci's famous enigmatic masterpiece. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the governor of the bank of england, mark carney, has given another strong hint that interest rates will rise this autumn for the first time in a decade. the base rate was cut to the current record low — of a quarter of i% — after the eu referendum. the bank has since been under mounting pressure to raise rates to help curb inflation. mr carney told the bbc that they are likely to rise
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in the "relatively near term." our correspondent simon gompertz reports. it looks like the cost of money, the interest rate on the cash we borrow, is about to go up, because this man, the canadian mark carney who runs the bank of england, has wasted no opportunity to ram home, like he did again this moring, that the bank's base interest rate is on the rise. what we have said is that if the economy continues on the track it has been on, and all indications are that it is, in the relatively near term we can expect that interest rates would increase somewhat. the history is that the bank base rate last went up in 2007. then, after the financial crisis in 2009, it was cut to 0.5%. and in the wake of the eu referendum, it was reduced again to an emergency low of 0.25% to calm nerves. now there's another concern — inflation. prices are rising by an average
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of nearly 3% a year and that is way above what the bank of england is supposed to allow. and traditionally the way it deals with inflation is to raise interest rates, to increase the cost of money, discourage people from spending so much. so in a couple of months‘ time, just as christmas shopping gets underway, we may have higher rates so more costly mortgages to contend with. so we think interest rates will rise by 0.25% in november. that will take the base rate back up to 0.5% where it has been for the past seven years or so. the crucial thing now is what the bank of england does around communication, communicating to businesses and consumers whether this is one and done, just a reversal of the emergency cut post the eu referendum, or whether this is the beginning of a series. this was mr carney‘s firmest indication yet that he would vote for a rate rise in november, although it is the whole of the bank of england's monetary policy committee,
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nine people including independent economists, who will be taking that decision. simonjoins us now. what will this mean for the likes of you and me? the sort of 0.25% increase that people are now expecting robbery from november would mean about £15 a month on the typical variable rate mortgage. that is about half of mortgages, so for a lot of mortgage holders on fixed rates they were given there were affected at all. if you are a saver, you have long drought of savings income because of interest rates being so low. so there will be a slight increase the sum people. if you go back more than ten years, we had bank base rate of around 5%. now it isa had bank base rate of around 5%. now it is a quarter of 1% and might go
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up. so initially the impact is not so up. so initially the impact is not so large. but if over the next year 01’ so large. but if over the next year or two there are more increases obviously that will affect people more. this is the latest in a series of hints that rates might go up, but how certain can we be that they will? the governor of the bank of england is talking again, he may even referred to as another time. he has only several times. i think it is because the bank is given out signals before that interest rates are on the verge of going up and it hasn't happened for one reason or another, so they don't want to be seen as again crying wolf, they want to make it absolutely clear this time that it really is likely to happen and we should expect probably by christmas to seek higher interest rates. thank you, simon. a former senior civil servant has urged the government to pause
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the roll—out of its universal credit scheme, which merges six benefits into one. a dozen conservative mps have also written to the work and pensions secretary, david gauke, calling for the roll—out to be paused.dame louise casey , who was honoured for her work in government helping families and vulnerable people , told the bbc that the time it takes to deliver the payments could push claimants into "dire i think they should pause on it. i don't say that lightly. i completely agree that we all should be wedded to the principle and therefore the overall policy that work should pay. where they are ending up is that benefits will punish, and i don't think that is the intention of anybody here. and it is about delivery, so the overall strategy might be right, the overall intention might be right, but the fa ct of intention might be right, but the fact of the matter is the actual delivery of it means some people because of the waiting time before benefit kicks in will end up in dire
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circumstances. more dire than i think we have seen in this country the years, and that we have to stop. and i think it is ok occasionally to say we didn't get the implementation com pletely say we didn't get the implementation completely right, let's pause and see what we can do. at the moment everybody is holding outwith, where pressing on, where pressing on. it's likejumping pressing on, where pressing on. it's like jumping over a cliff. pressing on, where pressing on. it's likejumping over a cliff. 0nce pressing on, where pressing on. it's likejumping over a cliff. once you jump likejumping over a cliff. once you jump you end up in the bottom, and we don't want that to happen. theresa may has said she wants to see eu negotiators respond in kind to the proposals she set out in her speech in florence last week, in order to unlock the brexit talks. speaking at a summit in estonia, the prime minister said she had seen signs to suggest her intervention had broken the deadlock in the negotiations. but the head of the european commission, jean—claude junker, warned he didn't think sufficient progress had been made. he said it would take a miracle for trade talks to start next month. gavin lee is in tallinn for us. this has been billed as a digital
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summit, but how much is it likely to be overshadowed by brexit?” summit, but how much is it likely to be overshadowed by brexit? i think there is an attempt to make sure it isn't overshadowed by brexit, and thatis isn't overshadowed by brexit, and that is the point that theresa may, she is nimbly dancing on the sidelines of this party because emanuel macron came here last night to give his vision that he had outlined in paris earlierfor a more integrated europe, he had said he felt the ten years there had been lifeless eu which had he said david cameron to call for a referendum which he said he believed david cameron did not properly call for. it was that yes stay in but referendum. it is about the future, the digital future as well. theresa may was briefed by donald tusk, to
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say don't talk about brexit. and today she has brief conversations with angela merkel about the fact that in three weeks' time she will have to find out is their significant progress so far. this is what theresa may had to say when she arrived earlier this morning. i have set out in my foreign speech the progress that we've made on a number of issues and the vision that i have for the deep and special partnership that we can develop with the european union in future. i am pleased that the negotiations have been making progress and i look forward to developing that deep and special partnership with the eu because i think it is not only in the interests of the uk, it's in the interests of the eu as well. as all the leaders arrived earlier today, some of them talked about brexit. i managed to talk to jean—claude junker. it's worth saying he is a conduit for these talks, he is the boss of michel barnier, the chief negotiator for
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the eu. he also has a pinball machine. this is what he had to say. i'm saying that between now and october no progress will be made unless miracles can happen. but you are known for your pinball skills, you are a pinball wizard. if brexit was a pinball game, do you feel it is going right direction? we are making progress. soi so i think even know these talks about something else today it is a good point you make. ultimately is it being overshadowed 7 good point you make. ultimately is it being overshadowed? the leaders we re it being overshadowed? the leaders were willing to talk about it. in three weeks' time they all meet in brussels they will also have to look at is that significant progress on the exit bill, the citizens rights,, irish border. the lithuanian president... today we can say that things are a little bit behind schedule and already we are facing additional for brexit. and this is the message we need to be acknowledging to each other —
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is see that. quite lithuania has no individual interests, it's all european interests. and we need to find a joint solution good for all. we know from the talks this morning with angela merkel and theresa may, according to downing street angela merkel praised theresa may for the florence speech she made last week when she said britain will stay in the eu till 2021 to be able to get out smoothly. the eu leaders have to agree to that. somebody put it to me
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this has been about by the way diplomacy, because theresa may nose in three weeks' time they have an important vote and so far jean—claude junker thinks a miracle would need to happen. thank you. 25 asian countries to participate in summits. the visit will be part of an asia tour that includes china, vietnam and the philippines between the third and fourteenth of november. 0fficials officials said the president's engagements would strengthen the international resolve to confront the north korean threat. ukip is set to unveil its fourth leader in just over a year after a contest that has divided the party. anti—islam campaigner anne marie waters is the favourite to win. but as members meet in torquay for their annual conference, many of the party's 20 meps have threatened to resign if she succeeds. 0ne told the bbc it would take ukip
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"down a very dark alley". she faces a strong challenge by the party's deputy leader peter whittle. patient care is being damaged because of a shortage of nurses, according to the royal college of nursing, in some cases meaning patients are dying alone on wards. 30 thousand of its members across the uk responded to a survey, with more than half of them saying they were upset after their last shift because they couldn't provide the care they wanted. here's our correspondent jenny walrond. ifeel like i'm spinning plates but the plates are patients. that to me is the worst feeling. i no longer wish to be a nurse. i'm not able to provide my patients with even the basics of nursing care due to the constant lack of staff. i failed my patients, colleagues and now my family. i cried all the way home. i drove home from work sobbing today knowing that the patients i care for
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did not even get a fraction of the level of care that i would consider acceptable. i felt useless, unsafe and out of my depth. i now worry every time i drive to work. the royal college of nursing asked members in may to describe their last shift. among more than 30,000 responses, they heard from many nurses describing themselves as exhausted, demoralised and totally to give theexcellentcare do not have the time to provide the caring aspect. the rcn is now calling for legislation guaranteeing safe and effective nurse staffing. it says members are reporting delays in giving essential medication such as insulin for diabetics and antibiotics for sepsis.
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patients wetting their beds because there was no one to help them to the bathroom. and people dying alone. i think we have now got to the stage where the nhs is in the worst level that i have seen it in my a0 year career as a nurse. and i think we are now seeing patient care suffer because of it. the department of health said there are over 11,000 more nurses on the wards than seven years ago and it has committed to funding an extra 10,000 posts for nurses and other health workers by 2020. but the rcn says that is just a drop in the ocean. nhs providers, which represents hospitals and other health trusts, says the report is a powerful reminder of the relentless pressures faced by front line staff. jenny walrond, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news: the governor of the bank of england
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gives his clearest signal yet that interest rates are set to rise for the first time in ten years. the government is urged to halt the roll—out of the universal credit benefit system amid warnings that families could be left homeless and destitute. the aviation minister says ryanair has behaved disgracefully towards its passengers for its handling of the cancellation of thousands of flights. and in sport: manchester city manager pep guardiola says he'll meet with sergio aguero this afternoon following the striker‘s crash in holland — which puts him in doubt for this weekend's clash with chelsea. dele alli will miss england's next world cup qualifier — he's been banned for one international match by fifa following "that" hand gesture during a match earlier this month. england have removed the dangerous chris gayle in their fifth and final one day international against the west indies. he went for a quickfire a0. a moment ago the windies were 86 for two. i'll be back with more on those stories later. three former tesco executives
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are in court over their alleged role in a multi—million pound accounting scandal. the supermarket‘s former managing director, its finance director and food commercial director are accused of helping to inflate the company's profits in 2014. all three men deny charges of fraud by abuse of position, and false accounting. 0ur correspondent adina campbell is at southwark crown court. what has the court hearing? this afternoon the prosecution has been outlining its case involving these three men accused of fraud and false accounting, dating back to this scandal back in 2014. this is considered to be one of the most high—profile prosecutions by the
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serious fraud office. as i say, these three men at the centre of the trial held senior positions at tesco backin trial held senior positions at tesco back in 2014. they are the brought formerfinance back in 2014. they are the brought former finance director, for now fine managing director, and the uk commercial directorfor fine managing director, and the uk commercial director for food. the serious fraud office started investigating the case back in 2014 after tesco was forced to admit that it had overstated its profits by approximately £250 million. the three men are accused of failing to rectify those figures and publishing the correct figures to all gritters to wider members of the community, and to tesco employees. today the prosecutors said the three men were involved in so—called white collar crime. they say they were not the foot soldiers but in fact the general soldiers who were in these
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high paid positions and were responsible and accountable for these wrong numbers. prosecutors say these wrong numbers. prosecutors say the men grossly inflated their profits and accused them of cooking the books and mass are showing the figures. thejury was the books and mass are showing the figures. the jury was also told about the compensation packages which involved salary, benefits and shares, amounting to more than one 01’ shares, amounting to more than one or £2 million each. we also heard some of the tesco employees resigned from their prestigious roles within the company because they didn't want to allegedly become involved in illegitimate accounting processes. this of course led to a huge scandal. it sent shock waves through the stock exchange, £12 billion wiped off and leading to tesco having to admit that their numbers we re having to admit that their numbers were in fact wrong. the three men of course deny the charges, they have pleaded not guilty, they deny any wrongdoing, and the trial here is
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expected to last the three months. the aviation minister, lord callanan, has accused ryanair of behaving "disgracefully" towards its passengers for its handling of the cancellation of thousands of flights. the civil aviation authority accused the airline of "persistently misleading passengers" about the kind of compensation they can claim. ryanair says it will fully comply with all the requirements. let's speak now to coby benson, who is a flight delay compensation solicitor at the law firm bott and co. he's in our salford studio. thank you for talking to us. if an airline cancels flights as ryanair has done, how clear is the law on what needs to be done? the law is extremely clear. it is very simple. if your flight has been cancelled and a passenger has less than 14 days notice they are entitled to compensation. as long as it was not
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caused by extraordinary circumstances. rya nair have caused by extraordinary circumstances. ryanair have already admitted it is not an extraordinary circumstance, it should be paying compensation. what they are disputing though is that they should have to re—route passengers on other airlines, the law is absolutely clear that they should be re—routing passengers on any airline and ensuring those passengers get to that final destination at the earliest opportunity. so if someone is watching this he was booked on a ryanairflight is watching this he was booked on a rya nair flight that has is watching this he was booked on a ryanair flight that has been cancelled, what should they do? the first step is to contact ryanair to ensure they can get a replacement flight. i ensure they can get a replacement flight. i suspect that ryanair will offer them in the first instance a ryanairflight, offer them in the first instance a ryanair flight, but offer them in the first instance a rya nair flight, but that offer them in the first instance a ryanair flight, but that could be a few days or even a week later, and thatis few days or even a week later, and that is not going to be convenient for them, so they should first ask ryanair has for them, so they should first ask rya nair has put for them, so they should first ask ryanair has put them on another flight ryanair has put them on another flight perhaps with another airline, they could even suggest a train journey and achieves the same goal. if ryanairare journey and achieves the same goal. if ryanair are still not paying for
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this replacement flight, they can pay for it themselves and then go back to ryanair and insist those expenses are paid by them. just to rewind a couple of steps, a lot of passengers have been complaining they have been stuck on premium rate phone lines are two hours trying to get through to ryanair, what happens if they can't actually contact the airline? it is very difficult situation that ryanair face, especially given the sheer number of passengers that are affected. 400,000 passengers have been a fair estimated to have been affected in the last week or so alone. ryanair will no doubt have procedures in place. i understand they have introduced a special team to deal exclusively with this. but the passengers at the end of the day should not be inconvenienced or out of pocket for this. it might be that in order to rectify matters as quickly as possible they have to rebook those flights themselves, perhaps with another carrier, and then go back to ryanair at a later date to get the expenses reimbursed. and presumably keep all receipts.
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absolutely. have you ever seen anything like this before? there are very few situations which have occurred in the history of this particular piece of legislation, which is over a decade old now, perhaps the one that comes closest is the icelandic volcano in 2010 which affected an enormous number of people. the airlines also had to pay foran people. the airlines also had to pay for an enormous amount of expenses but at the end of the day they had to foot the bill. thank you for your time. a climber from wales has been killed at yosemite national park in california. andrew foster, who was 32, was trapped by a massive rock—fall below the face of the huge granite mass el capitan on wednesday. his wife is in hospital with serious injuries. 0ur correspondent richard galpin reports. already this week there have been two major rock falls from the iconic
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granite dome known as el capitan. for those caught beneath the only way to stay alive is to get out as fast as possible. the 32—year—old british climber andrew foster did not make it. he was trapped by rocks weighing more than 1000 tonnes which fell off el capitan on wednesday afternoon. he and his wife who was injured were checking the routes to the top. they were not actually rock climbing at the time, they were walking along near the base of the dome, sweet looking at climbing routes and it was just a tragic, tragic situation, the wrong place at the wrong time. and yesterday was another incident, as more rocks came crashing down the cliff face. this man was injured when a rock came through the roof of their car as they dry to escape. —— tried to escape. it sounded like thunder. and she looked back and said, there is smoke
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coming out of the mountain. the mountain has exploded, it is falling, falling, we were driving as far as we could. at the same time i husband reached up and he said my head, my head, he was bleeding profusely and hurting. the routes at el capitan, all 3600 feet of it are amongst the world's greatest rock climbs and attract experienced mountaineers like andrew foster and his wife lucy. in a statement, patagonia the outdoor clothing company which andrew foster worked for,l said he was a much loved member of their team and a passionate climber, mountaineer and skier who loved being in the out doors. his wife remains in hospital where she is being treated for serious injuries. richard galpin, bbc news. the bbc understands that armoured vehicles designed to protect british troops from roadside bombs in iraq and afghanistan keep breaking down. it's understood that in hot
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conditions there are serious reliability problems with the foxhound vehicles, which cost nearly £1 million each. the ministry of defence says the foxhound has been keeping soldiers safe. french art experts say a charcoal drawing of a nude woman — which has been in a french collection for 150 years — could be a sketch for the mona lisa. it had previously been attributed to the leonardo da vinci's studio, but not the artist himself. experts say it is almost certainly a preparatory work for an oil painting and is of truly remarkable quality. joining me now for more on this is art historian and presenter britain's lost masterpieces bendor grosvenor. do you think it's real? i'm not a specialist and i've only seen photographs but i have to say it
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looks like a drawing of the most extraordinary quality. and the fact new tests now suggest it is in the right time period and possibly by leonardo is very exciting. can you tell us more about the tests? how'd go about proving something is by an artist? first it is very difficult to prove, but in this case we would dealing with the drawing which was thought to have been done after leonardo died. but the new tests have now approved the paper it is made on in the way it is constructed, that it could have been donein constructed, that it could have been done in the very first decade of the 16th century. so it is now believed to be in the right period to have been done by leonardo himself. then proving it is by him is a different question, because that is subjective about the quality. so now we need to gather all the world's leonardo experts say is it good enough to be by the man himself? are the little holes around the edge of the drawing which might suggest it is a tracing
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of some kind? it looks like it was used to then transfer the design onto a panel for a painting. used to then transfer the design onto a panel fora painting. so used to then transfer the design onto a panel for a painting. so what we are dealing with here is possibly a preparatory drawing, but is there another painting which relates to it out there? we may never know. and that may be the next really exciting discovery. i don't actually think that while it might be by leonardo himself, i don't think we can say it isa himself, i don't think we can say it is a territory drawing for the mona lisa, because the face we see this drawing is subtly different to the model in the mona lisa. that is interesting. how do these things start? does it come from one curator having a hunch that something needs to be investigated more fully?m often does. just one pair of eyes looking at something afresh. we don't have this idea in art history that we know who painted andrew everything. but in many cases we are only scratching the surface. and
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when you are dealing with a picture of the beaten path which may have beenin of the beaten path which may have been in storage for decades, somebody may not have properly analyse this for the last hundred yea rs. analyse this for the last hundred years. thank you. helen willetts has the weather. the rain will continue to clear from eastern areas to give many a brighter end of the day. but the showers are coming in thick and fast to the north and west and heavy on the stiff breeze. showers elsewhere overnight but the most notable feature will be how chilly it is. compared with recent nights. a bright start but the second part of the weekend looks much wetter. gail is quite widely. a decent day on saturday to start, a few showers tending to push eastwards but not seeing one or two in most places. not as warm as it has been but later
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on we get the rain in. through saturday evening and overnight it won't be as chilly, it will turn quite muggy. some tropical air mixed in. the raid will be heaviest over the hills in northern and western areas but it is blown in by gale force winds over many coasts and hills. more on that on the website. this is bbc news. our latest headlines... the governor of the bank of england has suggested that interest rates are set to rise for the first time in ten years — potentially as soon as november.
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the prime minister has been urged to pause the rollout of universal credit, with a warning that families could be left destitute. the civil aviation authority has given ryanair a deadline of 5pm today to comply with demands regarding treatment of passengers or be taken to court. the aviation minister has accused the airline of treating passengers "disgracefully". three former tesco executives are in court over their alleged role in a multi—million pound accounting scandal. the three men all deny helping to inflate the company's profits in 2014. let's get the latest sports news with holly hamilton. manchester city's sergio aguero is on his way back from holland where he was injured ina back from holland where he was injured in a car crash last night.
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ina injured in a car crash last night. in a press conference in the last couple of hours hour manchester city manager pep guardiola suggested the striker had broken a rib. the player missed training this morning and will be assessed by the club's medical team later today. our football reporter simon stone was at guardiola's press conference. in terms of sergio aguero, he was clearly in holland and yes it was his day off but it was 11 o'clock in holland when he had that accident. is that a problem for you? no. purely because he was on his day off? the day off? have you spoken to him? not yet. there was nothing. but i know he is ok. he is ok, that is
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the most important thing. injury problems at man united, the manager has confirmed that paul pogba is out for the long—term. the french international limped off 19 lives into their champions league win over arsenal on the 12th of september. he has missed their last four games. jose mourinho but still not give a specific timescale over when he will return. tottenham and england midfielder dele alli has been banned for one international match for the gesture he made during the world cup qualifier against slovakia earlier this month. he has also been fined just under £4000 for making what fifa described as an offensive and on sporting gesture during the game. it means you will miss the qualifier at wembley against lavinia next thursday. . mo marley has been appointed interim head coach of
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england women. she takes over from mark sampson, who was sacked earlier this month. she moves up from her role in charge of the england under 19 team and will leave the senior side ina 19 team and will leave the senior side in a friendly against france in 0ctober. south ribble rick scott byron mcguigan and stuart armstrong have been ruled out of scotland is my crucial upcoming world cup qualifying double—header with hamstring and calf injuries. gordon strachan ‘s side face slovakia and slovenia next thursday on sunday as a sick to secure a play—off place. they are currently fourth in group f. they are currently fourth in group f, six points behind the leaders, england. scotland will finish second should they win their next two matches. england are playing the west indies in the fifth and final one—day international in southampton. eoin morgan's side won the toss and chose to bowl but rain has delayed the start of play. the west are currently 98—2 after 20 overs. england are without ben stokes and alex hales following their involvement in an incident outside a nightclub in the early hours of monday morning. it is
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official, birmingham hippodrome backing to be the uk's candidate city for the 2022 commonwealth games. other countries will have until saturday to their bid. the federation has adjusted birmingham could still face competition from canada, malaysia and australia. staging the event would cost at least £750 million, making it the most expensive sport event here since london 2012. i think it is so much more than a multisport international event, it is a real opportunity to regenerate a part of the city and we will be using this to make some major regeneration and this is an opportunity to present the image of the region to the world and if you live for the commonwealth games in manchester in 2002, of glasgow in 2014, and we want to have a similar success here for birmingham and this region, an opportunity to bring the world could the region. that is all the sport.
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more on the next 30 minutes. we will look forward to that. thank you. a stampede at a railway station in india's financial hub, mumbai, has left more than 22 people dead. the stampede occurred during the rush hour on a narrow pedestrian bridge leading to elphinstone road station, one of the busiest and most congested in the city. 0ur correspondent, yogita limaye, sent this report from the scene. this is the flight of stairs at the elphinstone road station where the stampede occurred earlier this morning. it leads to a little bridge across the station. this station is a small but important stop on the city's western railway line. it is not rush hour right now but you can look at it and see how crowded it is even now and this incident occurred just shortly after rush hour this morning. authorities are still finding out what triggered it but many people are saying it was raining heavily at the time and that is why people rushed in from here on to this little flight of stairs, there were people rushing from the platform as well onto the flight of stairs, and that is what
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caused the stampede. and if you actually see here, this group of people standing around, you can actually see shoes of people that have been left behind. it is from this little hole there that a lot of people were trying to jump out and save their lives. the injured and the dead had been rushed to hospital nearby. i have seen police authorities as well as railway authorities coming here to find out what actually triggered the incident. but this once again put the spotlight on mumbai's transport infrastructure which has been heavily criticised for being sorely insufficient. it transports more than 7 million people a day. this is an important station for many people because this area, lower parel, is where a lot of commercial complexes, buildings, offices are located and you can just see the flight of stairs is so small that it is always crowded. somebody who actually uses the station every day told me that something like this was just waiting to happen. more now on brexit and the plans some people are making to ensure
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they can still remain members of the european union. the actor colin firth, for example, recently revealed that he is also now an italian citizen, making the decision to apply for dual citizenship because of britain's departure. and he's not alone. in many countries applications have more than doubled, as our reality check correspondent, chris morris, reports. some famous names and faces have been applying for citizenship elsewhere in the eu since the uk voted to leave. it was revealed last week that 0scar—winning actor colin firth is a citizen of italy. one million british people live elsewhere in the eu. many more in the uk have the right to apply for citizenship in other eu countries. since the referendum, they have been doing just that, in record numbers. it has not been possible to get full figures for every country but ireland clearly emerges at the top of the list. in the 12 months before
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the referendum, 25,000 brits applied for irish passports. in the 12 months directly after, it was more than 64,000. sharp increases have been seen elsewhere. in spain, numbers rose from 2,300 before the referendum, up to 4,500 afterwards. in other countries around the eu, sweden, denmark and poland for example, the number of applications also more than doubled. there are countries where data is made available in different ways. in germany, it comes state—by—state. so, in berlin, there were 60 applications from british citizens in the year before the referendum, and 810 the year after. france provides figures on a calendar—year basis. the increase is striking. from 385 in 2015, up to more than 2,100 in the first eight months of this year. this isn'tjust a one—way street, there are more than three million
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eu citizens in the uk, equally concerned about their status after brexit. again, the number of citizenship applications is striking. in the year leading up to the referendum, there were nearly 16,000. in the year immediately after, that rose up to 28,000. across europe, tens of thousands of people are taking the precaution of getting a second passport in case brexit negotiations fail. lots of brits are entitled to the citizenship of another european country. if you have a irish grandad or polish mum, for example. at the moment, that doesn't get you much extra because we already have all the rights of an eu citizen. a reminder why citizens‘ rights is one of the most important issues in those negotiations. this is about real people worried about their future. chris morris, bbc news. let's return to that warning that hospital patients aren't
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getting the care they need because of a shortage of nurses. in some cases, patients are dying alone on wards, according to the royal college of nursing, which has surveyed 30,000 of its members across the uk. nigel edwards is chief executive of the nuffield trust. welcome. and in birmingham is ed freshwater, a nurse and the chair of the royal college of nursing's mental health foundation. i can start with you. give us a sense of what your experiences have been, perhaps when your last shift? certainly. within mental health, which is a distinct specialism of nursing, we have stories of staff who are just unable to engage with the sort of therapeutic care that service users
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require. when i shift is short—staffed, one of the first casualties would be, for example, escorted leave for a patient. nipping to the shops from those people is an everyday, unremarkable event but for some one who has been detained for a number of weeks, that can bea detained for a number of weeks, that can be a significant part of their recovery that gets interrupted, it brea ks recovery that gets interrupted, it breaks down trust and it is not fair on the service user or the staff. nigel edwards, the royal college of nursing says the workforce is in crisis. does your research and what you have finite back this up? there isa you have finite back this up? there is a record number of nurses but also a record amount of work and are large numbers of vacancies to the average hospitals across england have got nearly 10% vacancies, particularly worrying is big vacancies in community nurses, nurses working with patients in their homes, mental health is a 12%
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and neonatal care is a big problem along with accident and emergency, tough places to work. and people are beginning to vote with their feet and unfortunately, just the point we're having the results of catastrophic planning by the workforce, whose job it catastrophic planning by the workforce, whosejob it is catastrophic planning by the workforce, whose job it is to work out how many nurses we need in the future, we have decided to make the uk are much less attractive place for people from the eu to work. nurses have stopped coming from the eu and that is another worry. you said catastrophically bad planning, i wonder if this is just a case of the profession leaving more money to pay for more nurses? 0r the profession leaving more money to pay for more nurses? or are some hospitals managing this better than others? nurses are leaving in quite a lot of cases and pay does not seem to be at the top of the list of the reasons why, there are issues about pay but other issues and the rcn and
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others have studied this, but there is something about the nature of the work under way people feel they are treated and there are more attractive, better paid jobs, treated and there are more attractive, better paidjobs, many people feel, that have less stress associated with them. what do you think would help, ed? pei is one of those things that gets discussed but as professionals, what we are really motivated to do is provide high—quality care to the people, to our patients. that is undermined when we have a vacancy rates and stress levels that are so high, if somebody goes off sick, all of a sudden their workload has to get picked up by team members who are already running at 100%. it is only already running at 100%. it is only a matter of time before things start getting messed before there are u ntowa rd getting messed before there are untoward incidents. it is a safety issue and unemployment issue and for
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us, we feel undervalued and we know that teams are running at full stretch and people did not want to go off sick, because they know they will let their colleagues down. ultimately, our health is forced to suffer and we did not get supervision regularly because is not that while our staffing levels to provide that but supervision is key for a mental health nurse to be able to work effectively we work with very stressful situations and beanie provision to be able to cope. would you be prepared to go on strike over this? there has been an opinion poll of rcn members on the subject of pain and we have conducted a summer of protest activities and that has left us with quite a vague promise from the government that they will give some tricks ability to the independent pay review body to consider scrapping the 1% cap but we will see what the autumn budget brings with it. we are campaigning
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notjust for paid brings with it. we are campaigning not just for paid today, we are really campaigning for effective workforce planning that will have enough nurses to provide effective ca re enough nurses to provide effective care on the wards and in the community. i'll edwards, picking up on that phrase, he mentioned the phrase untoward incidents, and there will be people watching those who will be people watching those who will wonder, at the lives of patients at risk? there is a lot of research linking quality of care to the numbers of nurses employed and particularly the number of nurses with high levels of qualification. if there are missing gaps and people are overstretched, then the chances of things going wrong, health care is very high risk with plenty of opportunities every day to get things wrong. if you don't have the right number of staff, then you are taking a risk. you heard that nurses are very professional and they will go the extra mile to keep their
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patients' say. but there is an issue, and that that's a great deal of stress on them so i think this does need to be sorted out. the problem is, i do not see any immediate long—term solution. problem is, i do not see any immediate long-term solution. nigel edwards from the nuffield trust and edwards from the nuffield trust and ed freshwater, the nurse and the chair of the royal college of nursing's mental health forum... i am gratefulfor your time, nursing's mental health forum... i am grateful for your time, both nursing's mental health forum... i am gratefulfor your time, both of you. thank you. some breaking news at the bbc. mikhail herber, 36, should be extradited to italy to face trial related kidnapping of the british model, chloe ed ling. that isa british model, chloe ed ling. that is a judge and westminster magistrates‘ court who has been that they will appeal that the man accused of the kidnapping of the british model chloe ed ling should
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be extradited in italy to face trial, according to a judge at westminster magistrates‘ court. more on that as we get it. in a moment, the business news. first, the headlines. the governor of the bank of england gives his clearest signal yet that interest rates are set to rise for the first time in ten yea rs. rise for the first time in ten years. the government is urged to halt the roll—out of the universal credit benefits system amid warnings families could be left homeless and destitute. 10k hello, the business news headlines... the uk‘s economy grew at a slower yearly pace than previously thought in the three months leading up tojune. gross domestic product grew by 1.5% from a year earlier, down from the earlier estimate of 1.7%. the office of national statistics said a key factor behind the fall
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was a drop in activity in the film industry following a particularly strong june. london house prices have fallen for the first time in eight years. figures from the the nationwide building society showed a drop of 0.6% over the past 12 months. across the uk as a whole, annual price growth slowed to 2%, down from 2.1% in august. london was the weakest performing region in the uk for the first time since 2005. the food standards agency is investigating factories owned by one of the uk‘s largest chicken suppliers. the guardian and itv news said workers at a two sisters food group site in the west midlands had changed slaughter dates to extend the shelf life of meat. the fsa inspectors found no evidence of breaches at the factory on thursday but continue to review the evidence. most of us are familiar with ikea
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and some of you might be a dab hand at putting those shelves together but for the rest of us this can be a struggle. the people at ikea, being thoughtful, hafod be san francisco abta taskrabbit, an app that finds people to do the odd jobs around the house that you would rather not do. st mirren hussain from new york joins us. this sounds like a good fit? several reasons why. if you look at ikea, it has been a little bit slow to become a little bit more digital savvy and in 2014, they saw that sales were actually starting to slip and that was a wake—up call for ikea. to try to get more digitally savvy so you can see that their online presence is bigger and stronger and they do more regarding shipping. having taskrabbit as a
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possible option for people to use when they are assembling those bookcases, that is a pretty good match for both companies. people here might not have heard of taskrabbit, is a popular in america? popular. people in the us, some people make their living just by using taskrabbit and it offers people an option to use the services of others. if you‘re somebody who is really handy at building ikea furniture, you can post on taskrabbit and say you are available and handy with building ikea furniture and if you are not handy, you can go onto the website and how that person to build your shells. it also works that if you are looking for somebody do something in your home might a picture frame, you can post on the website. taskrabbit
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members will say, ok, i can do that for you at that price. sounds like a dream for people like me who are rubbish at diy. volkswagen said the scandal over its diesel emissions is going to cost it another £2.2 billion. that‘s because refitting its diesel cars in the us is proving a lot more complicated than it first thought. it‘s already cost the company around £18 billion and vw shares fell about 3% on the news. and more problems for the uk building and services firm carillion. it‘s seen its share price fall 18% after it said full—year results would be below current expectations. the firm reported a first—half loss of £1.15bn and announced further write—offs. it‘d already written off £845m injuly. the carillion is one of the firms involved in building the forthcoming hs2 high—speed railway line. and elon musk is showing off again — he‘s unveiled plans to land at least two cargo ships on mars by 2022. mr musk says his existing spacex fleet of three spacecraft can
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finance the project. and the markets... the ftse 100 and the markets... the ftse100 doing quite well after the weakness in the pound. it is at its highest level in over two weeks and the best performer in europe. pound against the dollar was losing ground overnight and the update from mark carney, the governor of the bank of england, put a bit of extra pressure on the currency. mr carney stated that productivity slipped due to uncertainty over brexit, and he also expressed concerns for the level of uk household debt. those carillion shares that we mentioned earlier still in the red. they are down by about 18%. 50 years ago, a new bbc radio station and a new era of pop culture was born. dj tony blackburn announced "the exciting new sound of radio 1" and played the move‘s "flowers in the rain" as his opening track. this weekend, the station
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will celebrate its half—century. 0ur arts correspondent, david sillitto, reports. jingle: the voice of radio 1. and good morning, everyone. welcome to the exciting new sound of radio 1. i didn't suffer from nerves at all on that day. we've even got arnold... there were a lot ofjournalists the other side as i remember, a lot of cameramen the other side of the glass but it was very relaxed, only an hour and a half programme and it went very well, very smoothly. cheering. day one of radio 1 and for a young dj called tony blackburn this was a life changing moment. which was very nice. i enjoyed it. for anyone who thought tv would conquer everything this proved them wrong. radio was in many ways saved by pop music. the first record to be played was this... from the move it's called
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"flowers in the rain". # woke up one morning...# # making the garden...# and the man who wrote that song was roy wood from the move, elo and wizzard. aged 19 he had made history but he was fast asleep at the time and missed it. hadn't got a clue. it was a big deal being on radio 1. yes, yes, it was massive. usually have car radio on quite a lot and we would go, yeah, great. it was brilliant. then you knew that you were making a success of it. radio, we are made... and 50 years on the pop music formula is still thriving. there are now more than 500 stations, one recent new service is this, fix radio. what the dickens is this? so fix radio is a niche radio station targeted towards tradespeople. it‘s a radio station for builders.
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that's right, yeah, radio station for builders. the question is, 50 years on, what about the future, exactly how poptastic is the old wireless for today‘s discerning young listener? can i give you this? it‘s a radio. you‘ve got it upside down at the moment. could you find radio 1 on there? i‘ll try. what do i do here? use that dial, don't you? you‘ve never used a radio, have you? no. is this the one you find signals and stuff? you have done it. in one. i‘m a legend! do you ever listen to the radio? no. but 90% of us still do listen every week. cheerful company, good music, it will survive but your old school fm radio probably won‘t. dj: the first voice on radio 1 in 1967, tony blackburn, just walked into the studio.
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david sillito, bbc news. helen willetts has the weather. the weekend is upon us and it has been a soggy start to friday and administering away so promising and to the day for those living in guernsey, which had no rain falling on our goal and already the sun is shining in belfast. showers following behind and it has been quite extensive with misty, low cloud but between the rain we can see brightness and it is warm at least when the sun comes out. should bea least when the sun comes out. should be a fairly decent enter the day and the showers coming in on that stiff breeze to the north and west, particularly the north of northern ireland and showers through the southern coast as well holding temperatures up but the main change tonight means it will be cooler compared to recent nights. chilly starting tomorrow but a fine start and any mist and fog will clear
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readily. saturday looks like the driest day of the weekend, compared to today and what is coming on sunday. there will be the end of the day be more rain coming into the south—west of england and the west wales and as for a scattering of showers building up into the afternoon but again, that not last long. not bad for northern ireland nigel llong and apart from the odd sharp shower across scotland it is not big bad with temperatures notably lower. 0vernight, the rain ta kes ce ntre notably lower. 0vernight, the rain takes centre stage, particularly across the western hills, quite wet and windy in these areas with hill fog. quite warm and muggy and we still have the remnants of tropical airfrom the still have the remnants of tropical air from the storms in amongst this lot. it doesn‘t look a soggy start for sunday, this is a driving area of low pressure, a dig at tom windle low, not unusual for this time of year but the isobars are tightly packed, meaning a windy day for all of us on sunday as well as having
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rain. the heaviest rain will be over the hills and quite a murky day, not one for taking to the hills and very windy. severe gales in northern and western areas but that wind should blow the rain away to the second half of the afternoon so it might end on a bright note, sunday. but will not last as we have an escalation in the wind on sunday night into monday, just in time for the rush. plenty more online. this is bbc news. i‘m rebecca jones. the headlines at three: the governor of the bank of england gives his clearest signal yet that interest rates are set to rise for the first time in ten years. if the economy continues on the track that it‘s been on, and all indications are that it is, in the relatively near term we can expect that interest rates would increase somewhat. the government is urged to halt the roll—out of the universal credit
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benefit system amid warnings families could be left homeless and destitute. the overall strategy might be right but the fact of the matter is the actual delivery of it means some people will end up in dire circumstances. sidelined at the summit — as theresa may meets other leaders in estonia, the eu commission says not enough progress has been made to start trade talks.
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